Welcome To Gorey


Gorey is located beside the main N11 Dublin to Wexford road. The town also runs along the train route that hugs the Dublin coast.
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Information Gorey Ireland

A market town of significant size in north County Wexford, Gorey is located beside the main N11 Dublin to Wexford road. The town also runs along the train route that hugs the Dublin coast. At a drive of ninety minutes from Dublin when the traffic is good, Gorey is one of the satellite towns of the capital as commuters have deemed living in Gorey more affordable than nearer Dublin. This has led to a sudden increase in population in the last two decades, as well as an explosion in development. In 1991, its population was under four thousand. By 2006, it was over seven. In the surrounding areas, population has increased further. The town has had a presence of some kind since the thirteenth century, but it was only chartered in the seventeenth. At the top of Gorey’s Main Street stands the Court House. Originally built in 1819, it was destroyed in 1922 to be rebuilt shortly afterwards. A Church of Ireland church stands alongside the courthouse. Dating from 1861, it has some interesting stained glass windows. Market House on Gorey’s Main Street is a building that was redeveloped in 1709 and is now the seat of local government and the tourist office for North Wexford. It houses a chiming clock. It was in the past a temporary jail for prisoners who had been insurrectionists during the 1798 rebellion. There is other architecture of note in Gorey, and the Main Street has retained something of an old fashioned feel. Courtown Harbour, five kilometres from Gorey, is an attractive tourist spot. Six miles southwest of Gorey stand the Ballymore Historic Features, an ancient church, a Norman motte, a cemetery and a holy well among other architecture. The Donovan family – residents in the area for three centuries – have converted a hayloft in an eighteenth century farmhouse into a museum. Toys, lace, farm records and accounts, weapons and 1798 paraphernalia all coexist in the museum. Old dairy and horse drawn farm equipment are also on display nearby.

Attractions Gorey Ireland

Ballyhack Castle - Ballyhack

Ballyhack Castle is situated on a steep slope overlooking Waterford estuary. The Castle, a large tower house, is thought to have been built in 1450 by the Knights Hospitallers of Saint John. The Knights were one of the two great military orders founded at the beginning of the twelfth century at the time of the crusades.

Ballyhack Castle - Ballyhack

Ballyhack Castle is located on a steep slope in a commanding position overlooking Waterford estuary. The castle, a large tower house, is thought to have been built c. 1450 by the Knights Hospitallers of St. John, one of the two great military orders founded at the beginning of the 12th century at the time of the Crusades

Berkeley Forest House Museum - New Ross

Located at New Ross, Berkeley Forest Museum houses 18th and 19th Century toys, costumes, toy carriages, embroidered textiles and rare dolls - many of them from Irish families. The property is that of the family of George Berkeley, in whose honour the University of California is named. The fine collection is housed in the main rooms. A small pretty garden is included in the visit.

Duncannon Fort - Duncannon

Duncannon Fort is star shaped and built at a strategically important promontory in Waterford Harbour. It was erected in 1588 in the expectation of an attack by the Spanish Armada. There had previously been a Celtic fort and a Norman castle on the site. The fort is noted for its dry moat, exterior walls and the legend of the croppy boy.

Hook Lighthouse - Churchtown

Located opposite Churchtown, Hook Lighthouse was built in the thirteenth century as a navigation aid by William Marshal - Earl of Pembroke, as part of the development of his Lordship of Leinster. The massive structure has three stone vaulted chambers with a spiral stairway ascending through the thickness of the wall. According to tradition, a warning beacon was established at Hook Head in the sixth century by a Welsh monk named Dubhan, whose church still exists at nearby Churchtown. His successors were appointed custodians of Marshal's Tower and continued to keep the light for several centuries. Visitors to the oldest operational lighthouse in both Ireland and Great Britain will experience a journey through time from the story of the sixth century beacon up to present day light keeping.